TN Pass Cookhouse & Monument Canyon

For Kristine’s birthday, the Chalks visited the wonderful Tennessee Pass Cookhouse at Ski Cooper again but it was our first time with Sawyer. Its always a plus to go on a nice, sunny day for the views and so the dogs can hang outside the yurt while we dine inside. We have always gone for lunches at the Cookhouse for the views, but I hear the dinners are awesome as well albeit more pricey. Reservations are required for either lunch or dinner. More info on the Cookhouse can be found here. Sawyer did great on the brief mile walk to the yurt at about 10,800′ and she had a ball inside always scoping out the scene and her surroundings. It was a nice afternoon.

Me & Sawyer on the Cookhouse's front deck

Me & Sawyer on the Cookhouse’s front deck

Homestake Peak (13,209') across the valley which we climbed and skied almost exactly a year go. Kristine was pregnant with Sawyer at the time, though we didn't know it yet

Homestake Peak (13,209′) across the valley which we climbed and skied almost exactly a year go. Kristine was pregnant with Sawyer at the time, though we didn’t know it yet

Taking in the scene

Taking in the scene

Love the big wood stove inside the yurt behind us

Love the big wood stove inside the yurt behind us

Sawyer observing her surroundings

Sawyer observing her surroundings

Mom & daughter

Mom & daughter

We think Sawyer is figuring out what her hands and fists are and that maybe they are hers? :)

We think Sawyer is figuring out what her hands and fists are and that maybe they are hers? :)

On the Cookhouse deck after lunch

On the Cookhouse deck after lunch

Mt. Elbert from the Cookhouse

Mt. Elbert from the Cookhouse

The Tennessee Pass Cookhouse

The Tennessee Pass Cookhouse

Back at home relaxing on the couch

Back at home relaxing on the couch

And, with that, I got to throw a few climbing pics in here. Last week I received an email from my buddy Ryan Masters to join he and his girlfriend Stephanie in Grand Junction for some warm crack climbing. I mean “you had me at hello!”. So, I drove down to Colorado National Monument for the day on Sunday and had a wonderful time in the warm high desert sun on the awesome sandstone with Ryan & Stephanie. Was great to see Ryan again and catch up on all things mountain-related.

Ryan leading Dihedral 1 - Left Dihedral (5.8+), an awesome 90' route

Ryan leading Dihedral 1 – Left Dihedral (5.8+), an awesome 90′ crack route

Ryan at the crux almost to the anchors. There is a second pitch to this route which goes at 5.12 or so

Ryan at the crux almost to the anchors. There is a second pitch to this route which goes at 5.12 or so

Me leading Luhr's Route - Right Dihedral (5.9), a 120' really fun mixed route involving some technical face climbing past 3 bolts into an awesome arcing dihedral

Me leading Luhr’s Route – Right Dihedral (5.9), a 120′ really fun mixed route involving some technical face climbing past 3 bolts into an awesome arcing dihedral. Photo by Ryan

Stephanie in the dihedral of Luhr's Route

Stephanie in the dihedral of Luhr’s Route

I then led this rather slabby, tough, and runout sport climb next to Luhr's Route called Circle, Square, & theTriangle (5.10a). Ryan then led it after me as seen here

I then led this rather slabby, tough, and runout sport climb next to Luhr’s Route called Circle, Square, & the Triangle (5.10a). Ryan then led it after me and did an awesome job as seen here. I believe its much easier & safer for taller climbers (in terms of clipping the bolts)

Ryan higher on Circle, Square, & the Triangle

Ryan higher on Circle, Square, & the Triangle

Me leading the pretty cool 120' dihedral called Wide Load (5.10a)

Me leading the pretty cool 120′ dihedral called Wide Load (5.10a). Photo by Ryan

Me in the off-width portion of Wide Load, which I climbed much better than my last 5.10a off-width at Tiara Rado

Me in the off-width portion of Wide Load, which I climbed much better than my last 5.10a off-width at Tiara Rado. Photo by Ryan

Stephanie at the crux of Wide Load - an overhanging hand jam into insecure finger jams

Stephanie at the crux of Wide Load – an overhanging hand jam into insecure finger jams

Me leading our 5th and final route of the day called Out of the Frying Pan Into the Fire (5.9). This was a very stiff 5.9 in our opinion and I've heard the face climbing at the bolts is more like 5.10

Me leading our 5th and final route of the day called Out of the Frying Pan Into the Fire (5.9). This was a very stiff 5.9 in our opinion and I’ve heard the face climbing at the bolts is more like 5.10. Photo by Ryan

Ryan climbing the initial fun 30' of arcing finger crack before the face climbing on Out of the Frying Pan Into the Fire

Ryan climbing the initial fun 30′ of arcing finger crack before the face climbing on Out of the Frying Pan Into the Fire

Beautiful Monument Canyon. It was a nice day

Beautiful Monument Canyon. It was a nice day

Happy 12th, Rainie!

I guess its only natural that we start aging from the instant we are born, but its just not fair that our loving & loved canine companions age so much faster than us. My first love, Rainier, turned 12 years old yesterday (January 11) and while part of me gets sad knowing she is in the latter portion of her life expectancy, I am very fortunate, grateful, and happy to have been a part of her amazing life thus far and to have had her be such an important part of my life. I have always loved her unconditionally and have thought many times I would be willing to trade my life for hers. I go would through and do anything to save and protect her. You know you love something so much when you love that something more than yourself. We have been on countless adventures, hikes, and climbs together and have made so many unforgettable memories. She is such a special gal, the sweetest thing I know, and has been my best friend since I picked her up at 7-1/2 weeks old in Charlotte, NC in 2003. I cannot imagine my life without her. I hope she feels the same. While she is of course slowing down and getting more aches and pains, she is still such a trooper and is able to hike very well. We have all been so fortunate Rainie has been such a healthy dog her whole life. Except for a malignant tumor over a year ago, which was completely removed and excised, she continues to amaze me and many others in her abilities & energy for being 84 years old in human years.  I have so many photos of our adventures over the years, but here are a few blasts from the past:

Rainie on Lavender Col after climbing Mt. Sneffels in July 2004

Rainie on Lavender Col after climbing Mt. Sneffels in July 2004

La Plata Peak summit (August 2004)

La Plata Peak summit (August 2004)

Rainie coming down the class 3 summit pitch on Wetterhorn Peak in 2004

Rainie coming down the class 3 summit pitch on Wetterhorn Peak in 2004

Mt. Harvard summit (August 2005)

Mt. Harvard summit (August 2005)

Tent-bound on a winter attempt of Challenger & Kit Carson Peaks in 2006

Tent-bound on a winter attempt of Challenger & Kit Carson Peaks in 2006

A friendly Kristine & Brandon with a young Rainier on the summit of Huron Peak in November 2006

A friendly Kristine & Brandon with a young Rainier on the summit of Huron Peak in November 2006

Rainie with a young Kona

Rainie with a young Kona

Me & Rainier on the summit of Blanca Peak (Memorial Day weekend 2007)

Me & Rainier on the summit of Blanca Peak (Memorial Day weekend 2007)

Me & Rainier on the summit of Mt. Wilson with El Diente behind (September 2007)

Me & Rainier on the summit of Mt. Wilson with El Diente behind (Labor Day weekend 2007)

Wilson Peak summit (Labor Day weekend 2007)

Wilson Peak summit (Labor Day weekend 2007)

Me & Rainie on top of San Luis Pk, my final Colorado14er, in August 2008

Me & Rainie on top of San Luis Peak, my final Colorado 14er, in August 2008

Her namesake

Her namesake

Crestone Peak summit in  July 2009

Crestone Peak summit in July 2009

She likes her beer

She likes her beer

Rainie & Kristine at Lake Powell in August 2009

Rainie & Kristine at Lake Powell in August 2009

Rainie ready to climb Pyramid Peak

Rainie ready to climb Pyramid Peak in August 2009

Rainie & I descending from Pyramid Peak's summit

Rainie & I descending from Pyramid Peak’s summit. Photo by Caleb Wray

Mt. Yale's east ridge climb in winter of 2010

Mt. Yale’s east ridge climb in winter of 2010

Rainier makes a high-speed descent of the steep north face of Crystal Peak (April 2010). Photo by Derek Drechsel

Rainier makes a high-speed descent of the steep north face of Crystal Peak (April 2010)

Photoshoot

Photoshoot

A 2011 Covergirl. Cover photo by Joel Gratz

A 2011 Covergirl. Cover photo by Joel Gratz

Rainie taking a rest on climbing Mt. Antero, Kristine's final Colorado 14er in August 2011. Photo by Joel Gratz

Rainie taking a rest on climbing Mt. Antero, Kristine’s final Colorado 14er in August 2011. Photo by Joel Gratz

Summit of the Spider, Gore Range, with Rainie in July 2012

Summit of the Spider, Gore Range, with Rainie in July 2012

An old favorite - Uneva Peak summit in the Gores

An old favorite – Uneva Peak summit in the Gores

Summit of Wheeler Peak, New Mexico in May 2014

Summit of Wheeler Peak, New Mexico in May 2014

So, last night, as I believe one of Rainie’s favorite activities nowadays (other than having a tennis ball in her mouth) is swiss bob sledding down a ski mountain in my lap, we hiked up Arrowhead at a nice, enjoyable Rainie pace and cruised down perfect corduroy for 1,800′ in less than 10 minutes. Not to toot our own horn, but we have pretty much perfected the human/70 lb dog swiss bob sled down a ski mountain together. She absolutely loves it. She wouldn’t think of walking/running down on her own. She just circles around me waiting for me to say I’m ready for her in my lap. It was a perfect birthday outing.

Rainie & I atop Arrowhead for the nth time before our birthday swiss bob run

Rainie & I atop Arrowhead for the nth time before our birthday swiss bob run. This was also a great outing to try and forget the Broncos’s horrible loss to the Colts an hour earlier. However, I still love my new Broncos beanie cap thanke to Ken & Dianne

Maybe a year or so ago, Joel Gratz took this iphone quality video showing Rainie & I pushing off from the top of Arrowhead on our swiss bob. While the video is dark and somewhat grainy, I think it does show Rainie’s comfort & enjoyment. I hope to borrow J’s GoPro soon enough and video the entire bob run down the mountain.

Happy 12th bday, Rainie. Love you and looking forward to the next few years together!

Fall with Sawyer

Its been a wonderful 2-1/2 months thus far with little Sawyer. Enjoy the pics.

Thanksgiving at the Ciluzzis

Thanksgiving at the Ciluzzis

Sawyer & her posse of kiddos

Sawyer & her posse of kiddos

Sawyer among her future climbing gear

Sawyer among her future climbing gear

At our local Milk Creek crag Thanksgiving weekend

At our local Milk Creek crag Thanksgiving weekend

Rainier babysitting...

Rainier babysitting…

...while Kristine climbs one of our favorite little 5.8s

…while Kristine climbs one of our favorite little 5.8s

Diaper change at the crag: no problem

Diaper change at the crag: no problem

Lounging in her swimsuit

Lounging in her swimsuit

With Gigi

With Gigi

Waking up in the morning

Waking up in the morning

Me & Sawyer

Me & Sawyer

Ready to roll to our Homestead Court Club's holiday Christmas party

Ready to roll to our Homestead Court Club’s holiday Christmas party

Very attentive

Very attentive

And, very relaxed with Gigi

And, very relaxed with Gigi

Mom and I on a little hike

Mom and I on a little hike

First Starbucks run

First Starbucks run

Racked out

Racked out

Yawn...

Yawn…

Rock climbing at Milk Creek again: Kristine on the awesome 5.9 layback

Rock climbing at Milk Creek again: Kristine on the awesome 5.9 layback

Kristine getting into the off-width

Kristine getting into the off-width

Sawyer hangin' again at our local Milk Creek crag

Sawyer hangin’ again at our local Milk Creek crag

Rainier racked out

Rainier racked out

Yep, winter is here - time to bundle up!

Yep, winter is finally here – time to bundle up!

Outpost Peak

A climbing trip can sure take a 180 pretty fast due to the ever-changing weather forecast. With Kristine & Sawyer back in Minneapolis visiting her sister & family, the dogs & I were planning on heading to the desert for some crack climbing. However, a planned  trip to Indian Creek quickly turned to a local skin/ski of a nearby 12er called Outpost Peak in the Gores due to a wet forecast for the Moab area. It was all good & dandy though and good buddies Shawn Wright & Sylvan Ellefson joined me for a nice ski tour of Outpost Peak, which turns out to be a relatively accessible Gore peak from the Pitkin Lake trailhead even in winter conditions. I had circumvented and passed by Outpost Peak more than a half dozen times on several Gore outings, but had yet to crest its summit. Plus, I wanted to peer down its northeast face/bowl and scope it out for a potential spring time ski descent. A larger snow storm was to move in starting Saturday afternoon, but the morning was forecasted to be nice and sunny. After swapping Rainier for The Gus Dog with our good friends who just welcomed their baby boy into this world a week ago and running into buddy Elliot Halverson at the Pitkin Lake trailhead who I had not seen since last spring, we all set out booting up the Pitkin Lake trail at around 8:30am. Shawn & Sylvan’s good friend Zac joined us as well plus Shawn’s pup, Fitzy. About 400 vertical feet up the trail where it starts to flatten out, you leave the trail heading initially west and then northwest and bushwhack your way up Outpost’s broad south ridge through Aspen forests and shrubs. The morning was superb, and while the lower forested terrain was thin on snowpack in spots, which made for interesting skinning, above 10,000′ the snow was much more plentiful allowing for more efficient travel.

Skinning up through the lower Aspens on Outpost's broad south slopes

Skinning up through the lower Aspens on Outpost’s broad south slopes

Grand Traverse Peak

Grand Traverse Peak

Its always a treat for me to head into the Gores. I love this range. You can be all alone with your little crew on a peak in the Gores yet look over at Vail Mountain where 20,000 folks are gracing its slopes. It was a fun and mellow skin up through the forested south slopes of Outpost Peak, which eventually narrows into a well-defined ridge. At around 11,000′ the heavily forested terrain gave way to open fields and glades, which afforded us our first real views of the day.

The boys skinning in one of the large open fields along Outpost's south ridge

The boys skinning in one of the large open fields along Outpost’s south ridge

We crested over Point 11,637′ along the south ridge and then made our through more beautiful glades along the ridge towards Outpost.

Sylvan & the Solitude massif to the east

Sylvan & the Solitude massif to the east

The dogs follow suit

The dogs follow suit

Shawn offers Fitzy to Lord Gore

Shawn offers Fitzy to Lord Gore

Nice skinning along the south ridge

Nice skinning along the south ridge

Shawn & Fitzy approaching Outpost's summit pyramid

Shawn & Fitzy approaching Outpost’s summit pyramid

I was having some serious skin adhesiveness issues (or lack thereof) the entire day. My skins are at the end of their life expectancy and honestly I didn’t think I would be skinning peaks this early in the season. Nevertheless, after my duct tape failed and they just fell off for the last time 200′ below Outpost’s summit, I just left my skis & skins in the snow and booted the rest of the way.

The final few hundred feet to Outpost's summit

The final few hundred feet to Outpost’s summit

Sylvan reaching the summit of Outpost Peak

Sylvan reaching the summit of Outpost Peak

I believe we reached Outpost’s summit about 12:45pm and you could definitely feel the wind picking up, high clouds building, and a storm brewing in the distance to the west. Our bright sun and bluebird skies had given way to those pre-storm skies. Nevertheless, it was a nice summit and wonderful views. I think all of us enjoyed the perch.

Outpost Peak summit (12,362')

Outpost Peak summit (12,362′)

All of us enjoying this Gore summit - maybe except for Kona giving me the "I'm cold and let's get out of here" look :)

All of us enjoying this Gore summit – maybe except for Kona giving me the “I’m cold and let’s get out of here” look :)

Shawn & Fitzy with West Partner Peak behind

Shawn & Fitzy with the Partner Traverse behind

Sylvan doing the "Lyndon"

Sylvan doing the “Lyndon”

Peering down the northeast face of Outpost. Looks like a very steep entrance, but an awesome bowl down to the Pitkin Creek drainage below. Hopefully, this spring

Peering down the northeast face of Outpost. Looks like a very steep entrance, but an awesome bowl down to the Pitkin Creek drainage below. Hopefully, this spring

We then descended after maybe 20 minutes on top, strapped into our ski setups, and made our way down the south ridge sticking close to our skin track for the dogs’ sake so they could use it. I loved the views of Bald Mountain and its northeast facing bowl as well as Vail Mountain.

Bald Mountain & the Vail Valley

Bald Mountain & the Vail Valley

Sylvan skiing Outpost's south face

Sylvan skiing Outpost’s south face

Shawn & Sylvan

Shawn & Sylvan

Shawn in the fun open glades along Outpost's south ridge

Shawn in the fun open glades along Outpost’s south ridge

Mt. of the Holy Cross made for a scenic backdrop here for Sylvan

Mt. of the Holy Cross made for a scenic backdrop here for Sylvan

Shawn & Fitzy

Shawn & Fitzy

And, Zac

And, Zac

We eventually made it back down to the cars around 3pm for a RT time of about 6-1/2 hours. I believe the RT mileage is maybe 6-7 miles with close to 4,000′ of vertical gain. Outpost’s south ridge made a for a very nice ski tour in very safe terrain. Thanks to all the boys and dogs for making it a memorable day. Of course I missed Rainier on this outing, but post-holing in deep snow and uneven terrain for close to 4,000′ is just not for a 12 year old golden retriever. I think she understands, but probably not. I am already looking forward to going back in the spring to ski Outpost’s northeast face/bowl.

Top of the World & Tiara Rado 3

Well, little Sawyer is now officially 1 month old and we celebrated by taking her on a 4WD adventure in my Tahoe and hiked up to one of our favorite campsites we have dubbed “Top of the World” at 11,710′, her personal altitude record thus far in her short lifetime. Its only about a mile and 600′ vertical gain to the campsite from the parking spot, but man what a view of all of our favorite Gore peaks to the north, Tenmile Range peaks to the east, and Northern Sawatch peaks to the south.

Sawyer on the hike to "Top of the World"

Sawyer on the hike to “Top of the World”

Kristine & Sawyer - I didn't even realize that Zodiac Ridge made it into the picture in the distance between the trees

Kristine & Sawyer – I didn’t even realize that Zodiac Ridge made it into the picture in the distance between the trees

A gorgeous day to be up high

A gorgeous day to be up high

Kona!

Kona!

Raindog enjoying her first snow of the season

Raindog enjoying her first snow of the season

Family Pic at the "Top of the World" campsite

Family Pic at the “Top of the World” campsite

Mt. Silverthorne, Zodiac Ridge, & Red Peak

Left to right: Mt. Silverthorne, East Thorne, Zodiac Ridge, & Red Peak

Outer Mongolia Bowl and the northern Gores

Outer Mongolia Bowl and the northern Gores

(Left to right): The Grand Traverse, Palomino Point, Mt. Valhalla, and Snow Peak

Left to right: The Grand Traverse, Palomino Point, Mt. Valhalla, and Snow Peak

At about 2-1/2 weeks old, I took Sawyer up Arrowhead ski mountain with the dogs for her first time up this very familiar spot – one which she will undoubtedly go up and down on foot, skis, & swiss bobs hundreds and hundreds of times. She did so very well and seems to always love to be “on the move”. Its comforting for her. And, she didn’t fuss about being hungry until we got back to the car. Its about 2 miles and 1,700′ of vertical gain straight up the ski slope to the top of Arrowhead. This little first adventure for Sawyer allowed Kristine to finish her paper for her master’s class.

Top of Arrowhead

Top of Arrowhead (9,100′)

Then, the day before Sawyer turned 1 month old, Mike Santoro and I headed back down to Tiara Rado in Grand Junction for some more crack climbing.

Me leading 100' Hands again...just so good

Me leading 100′ Hands again…just so good

Me leading 100' Hands

Me leading 100′ Hands

Mike on the lower corner system of 100' Hands

Mike on the lower corner system of 100′ Hands

Mikey jamming

Mikey jamming

Mike

Mike

The feet are good on 100' Hands

The feet are good on 100′ Hands

After a cruxy roof move, I gave this route called Large Surprises a try...it was interesting

After a cruxy roof move, I gave this route called Large Surprises a try…it was interesting

Me in the thick of this offwidth crack...ugh. I had to aid my way up the final 20' using two #5 cams because I could not figure out how to make upwards progress. I think I will stay clear of offwidth cracks from now on

Me in the thick of this offwidth crack…ugh. I had to aid my way up the final 20′ using two #5 cams because I could not figure out how to make upwards progress. I think I will stay clear of offwidth cracks from now on

Mike on the initial roof move of Large Surprises

Mike on the initial roof move of Large Surprises

Mike laying back to the small ledge

Mike laying back to the small ledge

Sawyer is definitely getting bigger, able to hold her head up, and growing on Rainier & Kona.

Me & Sawyer

Me & Sawyer

Kona being a good babysitter

Kona being a good babysitter

Until next time...

Until next time…

Welcome, Sawyer

On October 12, 2014 at 6:45pm, our sweet little daughter, Sawyer Elizabeth Chalk, was born on her due date. At 7 lb 8 oz and about 19.5” long, she was a great size. Sawyer speedily came into this world as we arrived at the Vail Valley Medical Center at 5pm and Kristine gave birth an hour and 45 minutes later.

Sawyer Elizabeth Chalk

Sawyer Elizabeth Chalk

Apparently, Kristine was having contractions a lot of the day even though we both really had no idea what to look for in a contraction. At 3:30pm, her water broke and the apparent contractions were getting fairly painful soon afterwards. We then headed to the VVMC in a rain storm and our wonderful nurse, Andrea, measured Kristine at 9.5 cm dilated – “almost complete”, they said. Dr. Samuels arrived 20 minutes later, scrubbed up, and after some very painful contractions in which I tried to be her support stand, Kristine started pushing around 6pm to deliver sawyer 45 minutes later. Even if Kristine wanted an epidural, which she did not, it really wouldn’t have even had a chance to take effect as she was too far along and Sawyer would have likely already been born.

Kristine exactly 7 days (to the hour) before Sawyer arrived

Kristine exactly 7 days (to the hour) before Sawyer arrived

It was a pretty evening down at our local Eagle River Preserve

It was a pretty evening down at our local Eagle River Preserve

Lookin' good

Lookin’ good

We like this one

We like this one

Kristine had done it. She did phenomenal and Sawyer was just perfect. I went out and got us cheeseburgers and fries afterwards per Kristine’s request just like we would get after a long day of climbing. However, I think Kristine would say having a baby, especially with no pain relief, was tougher than any climb.

Sawyer

Sawyer

At the VVMC

At the VVMC

Baby Girl Chalk

Baby Girl Chalk

We spent almost 48 hours at the VVMC and were then discharged on a Tuesday afternoon. We went and picked up Rainie & Kona from Sarah & Keith’s house and again were all home together with our new family member. Ken & Dianne came into town late Tuesday night and met their first granddaughter and stayed the night with us. They then left Wednesday on their 5 day road trip to Utah and the Moab area. This gave Kristine & I some good time together to try and get used to life with a baby before the real help from Ken & Dianne came our way. They had a wonderful trip visiting Arches National Park over several days and Colorado national Monument outside of Grand Junction on their way back to Vail. They arrived back at our house just in time for all of us to catch the Broncos whoop the 49ers and to see Peyton break the all-time TD pass record. Kristine, Sawyer, Rainie, Kona, & myself had a nice 5 days together and took walks down to the river and down to Wolcott for some bouldering. Sawyer really seems to enjoy the fresh air. It was definitely an adjustment period for all of us, and will be for some time now, but all for the better. I think Rainie & Kona still think we are essentially “babysitting”.

All five of us back home together

All five of us back home together

Trying to do my part

Trying to do my part

Sawyer's first little outing on Day 3 down by the river

Sawyer’s first little outing on Day 3 down by the river

She's cute, but I'm biased

She’s cute, but I’m biased

Me and the little lady

Me and the little lady

Kristine & Sawyer at the Wolcott Boulders on Day 4

Kristine & Sawyer at the Wolcott Boulders on Day 4

Ken & Dianne were a huge help, especially to Kristine, the following week while I was back at work. It was wonderful having family here. They then left this past Saturday to head down to the Front Range and then back to Maine this week. I feel like that had an excellent trip between their Utah & Colorado high desert road trip, seeing their granddaughter, and giving us so much support & help with everything.

Ken & his granddaughter

Ken & his granddaughter

Sawyer & myself

Sawyer & myself

Watching the Broncos

Watching the Broncos

Nap time for all three gals

Nap time for all three gals

IMG_3956

IMG_3971

Ken, Dianne, & Sawyer

Ken, Dianne, & Sawyer

IMG_3979

IMG_3990Now, its just the five of us figuring things out as we go. I’m outnumbered 4 to 1 (females to males), but wouldn’t have it any other way. So, from here on out, we’ll have this blog for all of our climbing adventures as always but also for our adventures with the new lady on the block, Sawyer.IMG_3981

Last of the Colors

One local trail run I really got to doing fairly often this year is up the 11er Red & White Mountain north of Avon. I just wanted to post a few pics of the route and view from the top. I can’t think how many times we have visited its summit in summer and winter, but its always a gorgeous vista of the Gore Range, Northern Sawatch, Elk Range, Tenmile & Mosquito Ranges, and of course Vail & Beaver Creek ski mountains.  I honestly cannot imagine a better view from an 11,000′ peak. Always looking for the buster trail run of lots of uphill and vertical, I thought of running the Red & White Mountain road from Wildridge earlier this Spring. Indeed, it turned out to be tough and by the time I crested the summit, I almost collapsed in exhaustion. But, oh how I do love that feeling. Its a superb run with 2,700′ of elevation gain in about 4.5 miles one way to its summit. There are a few flat sections, but for the most part its at a steady incline with the obvious steeper sections including the final 500′ from treeline up Red & White’s bald spot to the summit, which is barely run-able as its pretty steep. I’ve run this route twice in the last week and just love it. The round trip trail run from my car to summit and back down takes me right at about an hour and a half (if I’m feeling pretty good).

Route up Red & White Mountain as seen from Arrowhead ski mountain. Click to enlarge

Route up Red & White Mountain as seen from Arrowhead ski mountain. Click to enlarge

View to the Gores from Red & White's summit on an overcast October 11, 2014 day. Yes, one day before Kristine gave birth to our daughter, Sawyer

View to the Gores from Red & White’s summit on an overcast October 11, 2014 day. Yes, one day before Kristine gave birth to our daughter, Sawyer

View south down to the Vail Valley from Red & White's summit the same October 11 day. I had my phone on me and could be down fairly fast as I was on call for a birth :)

View south down to the Vail Valley from Red & White’s summit the same October 11 day. I had my phone on me and could be down fairly fast as I was on call for a birth :)

I also hiked up Arrowhead ski mountain with Rainier & Kona and got some pictures of the fading fall colors this past week. The weather sure has been beautiful out here in Colorado this October.

Rainier looking very "golden" in the fading daylight with Red & White Mountain behind

Rainier looking very “golden” in the fading daylight with Red & White Mountain behind

Heading down Arrowhead

Heading down Arrowhead

Ripsaw Ridge in the Gores

Ripsaw Ridge in the Gores

Left to right poking above the timbered ridgeline: Eagle's Nest, Mt. Powell, Peaks C, C', D, E, F, G, & H all in the Gores

Left to right poking above the timbered ridgeline: Eagle’s Nest, Mt. Powell, Peaks C, C’, D, E, F, G, & H all in the Gores

Gorgeous light

Gorgeous light

Looking east to the Grand Traverse and other Gore peaks from Arrowhead

Looking east to the Grand Traverse and other Gore peaks from Arrowhead

Still some colors out there

Still some colors out there

Aspens

Aspens

One of my very few Aspen pics this year

One of my very few Aspen pics this year

Tiara Rado 2

Jesse and I returned to our new favorite desert crack climbing crag in Colorado National Monument outside of Grand Junction this past Saturday. Its a very nice day trip for me from Edwards while a much longer drive for Jesse from Denver, but its all worth it.

I led the familiar Short Cupped Hands (5.9+) and then Jesse jammed it very well

I led the familiar Short Cupped Hands (5.9+) and then Jesse jammed it very well

Jesse higher on Short Cupped Hands

Jesse higher on Short Cupped Hands

Temperatures were in the mid 70s and the weather was just about perfect. We saw two other fellas heading for Oompah Tower, whom we later saw on the Tower’s summit, but that was it the entire day. This place is a real gem. We went onto attempt the classic line called 100′ Hands, which goes at around a 5.10a/b. It was a very enduring pitch for me to lead, as it was just so long with not many rests at all, but I led it clean and was happy with myself. It definitely ate up the gear – a lot of gear goes into a 100′ hand crack.

Me beginning the lead of 100' Hands (5.10a/b)

Me beginning the lead of 100′ Hands (5.10a/b)

Getting my first piece of pro

Getting my first piece of pro

Getting out of the corner and onto the face about 20' up

Getting out of the corner and onto the face about 20′ up

Karate chop jams

Karate chop jams

So good and fun

So good and fun

Close-up of me plugging away

Close-up of me plugging away

A long route

A long route

Jesse on 100' Hands

Jesse on 100′ Hands

Jesse in the corner of 100' Hands

Jesse in the corner of 100′ Hands

Jesse hand & foot jamming

Jesse hand & foot jamming

Doctor Hill

Doctor Hill

Jesse nearing the final portion of 100' hands

Jesse nearing the final portion of 100′ hands

I then top-roped 100' Hands and had a good time swinging around on the way down

I then top-roped 100′ Hands and had a good time swinging around on the way down

We checked out the route called Singles (5.10a) next door to 100′ Hands, but we did not have any #5 cams, so next time. We scoped out a few more future climbs and then concluded with the familiar Dirty Martini (5.10).

Me leading Dirty Martini (5.10)

Me leading Dirty Martini (5.10)

After climbing Dirty Martini, Jesse had to stem up and summit this tower

After climbing Dirty Martini, Jesse had to stem up and summit this tower

On top

On top

Then, I had to do it, of course

Then, I had to do it, of course

Success

Success

On the hike out, the two locals we met on the hike in had topped out on the Oompah Tower. The scenery is spectacular and we really felt like we were understanding our surroundings better on this second trip to the area.

The two climbers on top of Oompah Tower as seen from the Tiara Rado crag

The two climbers on top of Oompah Tower as seen from the Tiara Rado crag

Oompah Tower (far right), Jolly Tower (middle), Terra Tower (far left) as seen from Tiara Rado

Oompah Tower (far right), Jolly Tower (middle), Terra Tower (far left) as seen from Tiara Rado

Incredible Hand Crack of the Monument (5.10+) center of picture as seen from Tiara Rado

Incredible Hand Crack of the Monument (5.10+) center of picture as seen from Tiara Rado

A few more routes of Tiara Rado can be seen here including the awesome looking perfect dihedral called Large Surprises (5.10a) left of center

A few more routes of Tiara Rado can be seen here including the awesome looking perfect dihedral called Large Surprises (5.10a) left of center

Eagle Tower

Eagle Tower

Bottle Top Tower

Bottle Top Tower

Definitely looking forward to many more trips to Tiara Rado with Jesse & friends, Kristine, & our upcoming new little lady.

Rockinghorse Ridge

Rockinghorse Ridge is a smaller section of the main spine of the Gore Range connecting the 12,965′ Peak P and its taller 13,041′ neighbor, West Partner Peak. The difficulties of the ridge are probably no more than a half mile in length, but what it lacks in length it more than makes up for in quality scrambling in the heart of the Gore Range. It is one of the classic ridges of the Gores and gets its name from a large tower along its ridge crest dubbed The Rocking Horse. A few years ago in July of 2012, our little crew consisting of myself, J, Baba, & Chuck descended towards Upper Piney Lake from the ridge en route to West Partner Peak from Peak P’s summit before the real complexities of Rockinghorse Ridge. This descent was due to several reasons: 1) because it was later in the day and boomers were starting to build, 2) we had no tent, there was a fire ban, and we had bivied in the Upper Piney Basin the night before in the worst mosquitos documented since the Great Gore Mosquito Influx of 1808 (this event is not real – the mosquitos were just pretty horrendous), 3) because we did not have mosquito repellent, and 4) because we did not want to stay out another night with no tent nor mosquito repellent and a fire ban in absolutely terrifying mosquito country. We had climbed Peak H that day, traversed The Saw to Peak J, onto Peak P, and we were en route to West Partner Peak when the decision was made to descend. Needless to say, The Rocking Horse has been always in the back of my mind ever since.

Rockinghorse Ridge connecting Peak P (left) to West Partner Peak (right) as seen from the summit of the Spider (12,692') in mid-October of 2011

Rockinghorse Ridge connecting Peak P (left) to West Partner Peak (right) as seen from the summit of the Spider (12,692′) in mid-October of 2011 on a climb of the Fly & the Spider from Booth Lake

View northwest of Rockinghorse Ridge and all of our favorite peaks from the summit of east Partner Peak (13,057') in July of 2012 before one of my Partner Traverse trips

View northwest of Rockinghorse Ridge and all of our favorite peaks from the summit of East Partner Peak (13,057′) in July of 2012 before one of my Partner Traverse trips

Fast forward to last weekend and I thought Rockinghorse Ridge may make for a nice fall day trip from the Booth trailhead in East Vail. A few usual partners in crime joined me for the ridge including seasoned Gore enthusiast Brian Miller & recent Gore convert Dillon Sarnelli. Friends Jason & Becky Blyth with their golden retriever Taj joined us for the hike in and branched off to climb West Partner Peak via its manageable west ridge from just south of East Booth Pass. It was just perfect fall weather. The Aspen colors were really about in their prime and the Booth trail is always a nice hike. We got hiking around 6:30am or so and leisurely took our time chatting and catching up with one another. The plan was fairly simple: head up to East Booth Pass, descend/traverse over to a point below the Rockinghorse Ridge saddle, climb up to the ridge, summit Peak P, traverse Rockinghorse Ridge to West Partner Peak’s summit, and then continue south along the ridge over to Outpost Peak’s summit. Outpost was a requirement for Mr. Miller (and me too) as this low 12er is one of the few Gore peaks we have yet to top out on. Unfortunately, with the late day storms rolling in and thunder very close by, we chose to descend before tagging its summit. Nevertheless, Outpost’s northeast bowl will be a great spring ski for which we have already started game planning.

Our Rockinghorse Ridge loop from the Booth drainage

Our Rockinghorse Ridge loop from the Booth drainage. Red is the approach up and over East Booth Pass and traverse to Rockinghorse Ridge. Green is the quick trip up to Peak P. Yellow is Rockinghorse Ridge and West Partner Peak’s south ridge.

Mt. of the Holy Cross from the Booth trail

Mt. of the Holy Cross from the Booth trail

All the Blyths & myself en route to East Booth Pass. Photo by Dillon

All the Blyths & myself en route to East Booth Pass. Photo by Dillon

Brian and the beautiful secluded lake just south of East Booth Pass

Brian and the beautiful secluded lake just south of East Booth Pass

Becky, Jason, & Taj broke off for West Partner’s west ridge a few hundred feet below East Booth Pass and we said our goodbyes. I always love looking down onto the rarely visited Upper Piney Lake basin. The view down from East Booth Pass surely didn’t disappoint.

Upper Piney Lake from East Booth Pass

Upper Piney Lake from East Booth Pass. The Saw is the skyline on the right connecting Peak H (center) to Peak J (out of picture on the right)

Brian mentioned he and Mike Rodenack had traversed from East Booth Pass across the west facing slopes below Rockinghorse Ridge years ago without dropping all the way to Upper Piney Lake and it had worked out well albeit they were on snow.

Brian explaining the traverse over to a point below the saddle low point of Rockinghorse Ridge from East Booth Pass. Photo by Dillon

Brian explaining the traverse over to a point below the saddle low point of Rockinghorse Ridge from East Booth Pass. Photo by Dillon

The route looked very doable and we made our way northeast across slabs with some class 3/4 scrambling thrown in for good measure.

Brian on the traverse from East Booth Pass

Brian on the traverse from East Booth Pass

Brian on a fun slab portion of the traverse. East Booth Pass can be seen on the far right

Brian on a fun slab portion of the traverse. East Booth Pass can be seen on the far right

Brian on a nifty little dihedral

Brian on a nifty little dihedral

Dillon took a higher road than Brian & myself for some reason and ended up topping out on Rockinghorse Ridge to the south of the deep notch marking the low point of the ridge. Brian & I made it over to the steep grass gully we were aiming for and climbed straight up to the ridge. We heard Dillon calling to us and waiving a map. He was stuck. Nowhere to downclimb to join us on the north side of the deep notch. I felt bad as he wanted to climb Peak P, but honestly downclimbing into the notch was low 5th class terrain and he was better off just staying put and relaxing a bit until Brian & I came over to him. At this point, we saw Jason Blyth on the summit of West Partner Peak and I think he saw us. Brian decided to cook up some pasta with pesto on the ridge proper (talk about brunch with a view) and I decided to just boogie up to Peak P. I love the views from Peak P. I feel like I’m really in the center of the Gore Range.

Upper Slate Lake basin as seen from the summit of Peak P including the four tiers of lakes, Peak Q on the right, and Peal L in the distance on the left

Upper Slate Lake basin as seen from the summit of Peak P including the four tiers of lakes, Peak Q on the right, and Peal L in the distance on the left

Peak L

Peak L

Looking north to Peak J and the northern Gores

Looking north to Peak J and the northern Gores

Rockinghorse Ridge to West Partner Peak as seen from the summit of Peak P

Rockinghorse Ridge to West Partner Peak as seen from the summit of Peak P

A few minutes on top and a few pics later, I scampered back down to Brian and he offered me some of his feast. Yum.

Dillon shot this zoomed-in pic of me coming down from Peak P

Dillon shot this zoomed-in pic of me coming down from Peak P

Brian's kitchen on Rockinghorse Ridge with Peak Q looming in the distance

Brian’s kitchen on Rockinghorse Ridge with Peak Q looming in the distance. Photo by Brian

Brian feasting

Brian feasting

We then packed up and made our way south to the first deep notch inn the ridge. Fun scrambling down and out of the notch ensued and soon we were heading onto the second deeper notch which had stopped Dillon in his tracks.

The first notch. We reclimbed right up the center (maybe class 4)

The first notch. We reclimbed right up the center (maybe class 4)

Brian downclimbing to the first notch

Brian downclimbing to the first notch

Brian climbing out of the first notch

Brian climbing out of the first notch

Good scrambling

Good scrambling

Brian & I were both looking to take the reclimb out of the second notch head-on to meet up with Dillon. I attempted the lower portion directly, but really came to an impass which required me to surmount a small roof with some big exposure in trail running shoes. No thanks. I circled around to the east side of the ridge to find a nice class 4 dihedral which accessed the low 5th class upper portion of the ridge proper. Brian found another low 5th class route about 20′ to the west of the ridge proper.

Me attempting the lower portion of the ridge proper out of the second notch before backing off and going around to the left

Me attempting the lower portion of the ridge proper out of the second notch before backing off and going around to the left. Photo by Brian

Me climbing the upper portion of the ridge proper out of the second notch. Photo by Dillon

Me climbing the upper portion of the ridge proper out of the second notch. Photo by Dillon

Brian topping out on his line out of the second notch

Brian topping out on his line out of the second notch

Looking down Brian's route

Looking down Brian’s route

We both topped out and met up with ole Dillon. Was good to meet back up with him. We continued south on Rockinghorse Ridge to The Rocking Horse tower. Some fun scrambling led up to the fairly mellow class 3 north ridge of The Rocking Horse.

Brian & Rockinghorse Ridge up to Peak P behind hm

Brian & Rockinghorse Ridge leading up to Peak P behind him

Brian & Dillon scrambling to the north ridge of The Rocking Horse

Brian & Dillon scrambling to the north ridge of The Rocking Horse

Me on a cool little catwalk leading up to The Rocking Horse. Photo by Brian

Me on a cool little catwalk leading up to The Rocking Horse. Photo by Brian

Brian climbing The Rocking Horse with Upper Piney Lake down below

Brian climbing The Rocking Horse with Upper Piney Lake down below

Dillon shot this pic of me scrambling up the north ridge of The Rocking Horse

Dillon shot this pic of me scrambling up the north ridge of The Rocking Horse

Where the ridge really got exciting was after (south) of The Rocking Horse starting with the downclimb off The Rocking Horse’s south ridge.

Coming down off The Rocking Horse

Coming down off The Rocking Horse

Dillon starting the mini-catwalk

Dillon starting the catwalk

Me on the catwalk. Photo by Dillon

Me on the catwalk. Photo by Dillon

Little did we know that Mad (Dad) Mike was coming down off Peak H at this same time (noonish maybe) and saw us on the catwalk after The Rocking Horse and shot a very zoomed-in picture of Dillon & myself. Thanks, Mike! Mike had traversed Ripsaw Ridge from Peak C to Peak H this same morning.

Mike's zoomed in shot of Dillon & myself from the slopes of Peak H. The Rocking Horse is to our left

Mike’s zoomed in shot of Dillon & myself from the slopes of Peak H. The Rocking Horse is to our left

We downclimbed off the catwalk and then a few more towers presented themselves. While one could likely skirt most of these complexities with 3rd class scrambling a hundred or more vertical feet lower on the ridge’s west side, we stayed fairly ridge proper and encountered plenty of class 4/low class 5 scrambling.

The downclimb after the catwalk and a few more towers to go up and over

The downclimb after the catwalk and a few more towers to go up and over

The remaining portion of Rockinghorse Ridge up to West Partner Peak as seen from the catwalk

The remaining portion of Rockinghorse Ridge up to West Partner Peak as seen from the catwalk

We even found one nice looking crack up one of the towers that I was determined to climb. It looked oh so good. This crux could definitely be skirted to the ridge’s west side via class 3 ledges and join up with this more direct route on top of the tower.

Me heading up the good looking crack. Photo by Brian

Me heading up the good looking crack. Photo by Brian

Me at the top of the crack. Photo by Brian

Me at the top of the crack. Photo by Brian

It was a tough move with some air below, but as long as you could get a toe in the crack as a foothold and a right hand/arm jam in the crack it was manageable (if 5.4-5.5 is manageable in trail shoes).

Dillon crack sequence pic #1

Dillon crack sequence pic #1

Dillon crack sequence pic #2

Dillon crack sequence pic #2

Dillon crack sequence pic #3

Dillon crack sequence pic #3

The scrambling to the top of this tower didn’t end there as there was an exposed traverse, a small knife-edge, and still some 4th class moves to be had.

Dillon on an exposed traverse above the crux crack

Dillon on an exposed traverse above the crux crack

Dillon almost topping out on the tower

Dillon almost topping out on the tower

The remaining portion of Rockinghorse Ridge up to West Partner Peak as seen from the top of this tower

The remaining portion of Rockinghorse Ridge up to West Partner Peak as seen from the top of this tower

It was then a mellower downclimb off to our next set of towers, which mostly could be skirted ever so slightly to the ridge’s east side. Though, one could climb these towers as we did on a few occasions (ya know, for the views).

More awesome towers everywhere you look on Rockinghorse Ridge. Photo by Dillon

More awesome towers everywhere you look on Rockinghorse Ridge. Photo by Dillon

The terrain then eased off into more “hikeable” slopes and we made good time up the remaining north ridge of West Partner Peak to its lofty Gore summit.

Dillon & Brian making their way up West Partner's north ridge with the difficulties of Rockinghorse Ridge behind them

Dillon & Brian making their way up West Partner’s north ridge with the difficulties of Rockinghorse Ridge behind them

West Partner Peak was a new summit for Mr. Sarnelli. It was familiar ground for Brian & myself, but always good to be back here especially having climbed a different route up this peak other than the class 3 south ridge or 2+ west ridge.

Me on West Partner Peak's summit. Photo by Brian

Me on West Partner Peak’s summit. Photo by Brian

West Partner Peak summit (13,041') with Peak Q behind to our right. Photo by Dillon

West Partner Peak summit (13,041′) with Peak Q behind to our right. Photo by Dillon

Rockinghorse Ridge to Peak P from the summit of West Partner Peak

Rockinghorse Ridge to Peak P from the summit of West Partner Peak

Outpost Peak from the summit of West Partner Peak, our next destination

Outpost Peak from the summit of West Partner Peak, our next destination

I think it was maybe 1:30pm or so and thunderheads were definitely already starting to build to the west and north. We then descended the class 3 south ridge of West Partner Peak en route to Outpost Peak. This south ridge is a nice scramble in itself and is featured in David Cooper’s book Colorado Scrambles.

West Partner Peak's south ridge

West Partner Peak’s south ridge

I kept looking west at the building storms and then when we had reached maybe the halfway point along the ridge to Outpost, the thunder let loose and it was close. We decided to retreat back down to the Booth drainage via a steep grass gully and save Outpost for another day (hopefully, this spring as a ski-mountaineering outing). I believe the grass gully we used as a descent route is the ascent gully Cooper describes to access West Partner Peak’s south ridge in Colorado Scrambles.

Descent gully into the Booth drainage from the West Partner Peak-Outpost Peak ridge

Descent gully into the Booth drainage from the West Partner Peak-Outpost Peak ridge

The views down valley into Vail and of Vail ski mountain with Holy Cross behind were phenomenal.

Fall colors down the Booth drainage and into the Vail Valley

Fall colors down the Booth drainage and into the Vail Valley

Beautiful

Beautiful

Booth Lake as seen from our descent gully

Booth Lake as seen from our descent gully

We soon joined up with the Booth trail and hiked the 4+ miles back out. As we descended into treeline, it sure was hard not to stop and take pictures of the gorgeous fall foilage. Brian & Dillon did a wonderful job at capturing the views.

Aspens. Photo by Dillon

Aspens. Photo by Dillon

Me on the hike out. Photo by Brian

Me on the hike out. Photo by Brian

Booth drainage hillside. Photo by Brian

Booth drainage hillside. Photo by Brian

We met up with Kristine for high-end mexican food at Maya in the Westin and topped off a great day in the Gores with margaritas, IPAs, numerous tacos, and brisket nachos. Solid day, fellas! I’d rather be in the Gores than just about anywhere. I think the same could be said for Brian. Dillon? Well, he’s getting there.

Tiara Rado & 37 Weeks

Its so nice to have some high quality desert crack climbing within a 2 hour drive of Edwards. Yes, the mecca of desert crack climbing is still an additional 3 hours drive in Indian Creek, Utah, but Grand Junction’s Colorado National Monument area does just fine for our needs. Jesse Hill and myself had been eyeing this obscure cragging spot called Tiara Rado for some time now and we made it happen this past Saturday. J and I drove down for the day and met Mikey and Jesse for some desert fun in the sun. Yes, it was hot. Temperatures up on the rock approached maybe 95 degrees and my feet were burning under the black climbing rubber. Fortunately, we had some good shade and realized the “Rado” may be more of an afternoon spot due to less direct sun as it faces more southeast.

Me leading the easiest route at Tiara Rado - an awesome cupped hands route called Short Cupped Hands (5.9+)

Me leading the easiest route at Tiara Rado – an awesome cupped hands route called Short Cupped Hands (5.9+)

Short Cupped Hands may be only 50-60', but it surely doesn't disappoint. Just awesome cupped hand jamming

Short Cupped Hands may be only 50-60′ in height, but it surely doesn’t disappoint. Just awesome cupped hand jamming

To keep some anonymity regarding this crag, I’m not going to disclose specific directions, but it took us a good 2 hour hike to actually find the crag, but now we know the “more efficient” route of getting to the crag.

J on Short Cupped Hands

J on Short Cupped Hands

Mikey on Short Cupped Hands (5.9+)

Mikey on Short Cupped Hands (5.9+)

Mike jamming

Mike jamming

Even on a Saturday in September there were zero other folks at the crag. Hopefully, this is a common occurrence. All we could hear was the loud speaker from the Tiara Rado golf course down below. I then led a fairly grueling 100′ 5.10 route next door to Short Cupped Hands called Dirty Martini. My feet were burning on this one as I was in the sun the entire climb. I could have used another #1 cam as I had to lower 15′ en route to pick up one and place it higher. So, not a clean send, but good beta for next time.

Jesse nearing the top of Dirty Martini (5.10)

Jesse nearing the top of Dirty Martini (5.10)

Jesse lowering

Jesse lowering

J laying back the crux section of Dirty Martini

J laying back the crux section of Dirty Martini

Jesse & J had fun stemming between the main face and a tower next to Short Cupped Hands as well.

Jesse climbing Short Cupped Hands as seen from Dirty Martini

Jesse climbing Short Cupped Hands as seen from Dirty Martini

Jesse on stem

Jesse on stem

Eiger Sanction-esque?

Eiger Sanction-esque?

J figuring out Short Cupped Hands

J figuring out Short Cupped Hands

J jamming up Short Cupped Hands

J jamming up Short Cupped Hands

J doing the stem

J doing the stem

By 3pm, we had pretty much gone through all of our water and Gatorade and it was still really hot. We had climbed these two routes a few times each and then called it a day as we still wanted to find a more efficient approach route. I checked out the route called 100′ Hands (5.10a/b) and contemplated leading it, but honestly I was so thirsty and we pretty much had nothing left to drink. Save it for next time. Honestly, we cannot wait to go back to Tiara Rado and climb more awesome cracks hopefully sooner than later.

The next day was a bit dreary with overcast skies and rain, but Kristine, the dogs, and I did one of our favorite little local hikes/runs – the A10 Loop from Edwards to Arrowhead. The A10 Loop is maybe 6-7 miles in length and it was a great 3 hour outing. Even at 37 weeks pregnant, Kristine still does superb and can crank on the uphill. The downhill is a bit uncomfortable, so maybe next time we will pick a hike with more up than down. Isn’t that how we always like it, anyway?

The Chalks on the summit of the A10 Loop (9,400') looking back into the East Lake Creek Valley

All the Chalks on the highpoint of the A10 Loop (9,400′) looking back into the East Lake Creek Valley

Kristine at 37 weeks with our little gal!

Kristine at 37 weeks with our little gal!

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