Sawyer’s 1st Successful Camp!

After two unsuccessful camping attempts with a much younger Sawyer in 2015, we were finally successful this past Memorial Day Weekend and let’s just say Sawyer passed with flying colors! As parents, Kristine & I were very pleased. And, we did it in one of our favorite car camping/climbing areas: Escalante Canyon, Colorado. One of these unsuccessful camping attempts was in fact in Escalante Canyon over a year ago. Sawyer’s sleep was disrupted by a heard of cattle “mooing” a few feet from our tent at 10:30pm, which forced us to abandon the trip and drive back to Edwards arriving home around 2am. Live & learn, I guess :) We packed up last Saturday morning and made the 3 hour drive to Escalante in our new 2008 4-door Chevy Tahoe, which we recently bought from my parents. Its nice for a change to have a reliable truck that can fit all of us comfortably plus not having to worry if the headlights will go out :) Our friends Keith & Sarah with their daughter Melodie (a month younger than Sawyer) and dog Molly were already down there as were friends Lauren & Steve (with their dog Scout) and our good buddy Mikey. After walking around with Sawyer in the backpack trying to get her to nap while Kristine and Keith set up our mega tent and pack-n-play, we returned having had no nap because of Sawyer’s new surroundings, sights, & sounds. Around 4pm, Lauren, Steve, Mikey, Rainier, Kona, Scout, & myself all went to the Interiors Wall and climbed 5 or so routes I was pretty familiar with including the “cave” routes called Interiors (5.9-) and The Shaft (5.10a). Keith came up to check out the cave as well. Arriving back at camp around 7pm, we all hung out around the campfire, ate dinner, and had a nice evening.

Me & Sawyer back at camp

Me & Sawyer back at camp

The Chalks

The Chalks

Sawyer

Sawyer

She looks like a camping county gal in her jeans and dinosaur sweatshirt

She looks like a camping county gal in her jeans and dinosaur sweatshirt

Our tent in an amazing setting

Our tent in an amazing setting

Sawyer & Mikey

Sawyer & Mikey

Kristine & Sawyer

Kristine & Sawyer

Sawyer stayed up late! I don’t think she went to bed until around 9:30pm. Definitely the latest she has gone to bed. She didn’t even wake up when Kristine, the dogs, and I came into the tent around 11-11:30pm. Gosh, she slept well. Must be that cool and crisp desert air. I slept well, too. I always tend to sleep better in the desert than just about anywhere. We woke up around 8am and Sawyer didn’t stir until 8:30am. Kristine & I looked at each other and we both noticed that “ecstatic” expression in each other’s faces. Maybe we need to do more camping!

Gorgeous Escalante Canyon from our campsite

Gorgeous Escalante Canyon from our campsite

Morning, Sawyer! She has much nicer Patagonia long underwear than I do!

Morning, Sawyer! She has much nicer Patagonia long underwear than I do!

Sawyer & Melodie

Sawyer & Melodie

The little gals and Rainier

The little gals and Rainier

We hung around and had breakfast and took the dogs down to Escalante Creek to swim while Kristine drove out to Highway 50 to get cell service and work on getting her condo under contract. When she got back, I had packed up the Tahoe and we were ready to roll whenever we were to be done climbing. Kristine was so wonderful to hang with Sawyer and the dogs by the creek while I took Lauren, Steve, Scout, & Mikey up to quite possibly my most favorite crack I’ve ever climbed: Willy’s Hand Jive (5.10+). Maybe that doesn’t say a whole lot, but I sure do love it. Keith came up with us as well to check out our crack addiction :)

Me on Willy's

Me on Willy’s

Jam, jam, and jam

Jam, jam, and jam

Placing gear before the crux pod

Placing gear before the crux pod

Negotiating the pod

Negotiating the pod

And....success!

And….success!

Mikey did a lap on Willy’s and then we went over to setup an adjacent route called Rusty’s Cave (5.9+). Lauren & Steve took a good stab at Willy’s and hopefully learned a few trick of the trade with regard to this thing called “crack climbing”. Its definitely very technique-driven and takes awhile to hone in on the various maneuvers that work or don’t work. We left the rope up on Rusty’s cave for Lauren & Steve as I needed to head out because Sawyer’s nap time was fast approaching. Mikey and I rolled back to the car by 2pm and we joined up with Kristine, Sawyer, & the dogs at the small picnic table in the shade. We met two nice women as well at the picnic table. One had a 14 week old son in the baby bjorn. We chatted for awhile as they were both originally from Austria. The woman with the baby lived in Ridgway and her friend was visiting from Austria to keep her company while her husband was guiding in Alaska. Turns out the woman with the baby’s name was Ava House, wife of Steve House, one of the most accomplished, respected, and skilled alpinists out there. Pretty cool. I had forgotten Steve House lived in Ridgway. Sawyer promptly passed out as soon as we started the 11 mile drive on the dirt road to Highway 50. She was exhausted, but a good exhausted. We arrived back in Edwards around 5pm very happy with how things went for Sawyer’s 1st successful camping trip.

Ancient Art’s Corkscrew Summit

Last Saturday my boys and I made a climb happen we had intended to do this past mid-December. That is, until rain and snow prevented us from going further west than Grand Junction. Nevertheless, we had a nice December weekend of come cold climbing in the Monument. The Fisher Towers northeast of Moab, Utah are soaring towers of mud some 1,000′ off the deck. Most of these towers are very hard (and scary) aid climbs, but there is one free climb called Stolen Chimney (5.10+) up this crazy mud formation with four-summits called Ancient Art. The most visited summit (and rightly so) is the awesome southern summit that resembles a corkscrew. This summit has to be about the wildest summit just about anywhere with some mega-exposure on all sides. Folks sometimes base jump from the corkscrew summit. Steve Cizik, Mikey Santoro, and myself were joined by Derek Drechsel as our 4th member and we hit the desert on Friday night. I do miss going down to the desert. I remember the first time I ever set my eyes upon the Fisher Towers was an early morning after waking up next to my truck and Rainier in my sleeping bag in the trailhead parking lot. Kristine, Rainie, and I had driven down to meet some of her friends from Aspen to climb and bike maybe circa 2004 with my friend Billy Larson driving his jeep behind us. We just pulled down some dirt road late at night and found a parking area and slept. Kristine slept in the back of my truck and Billy in his jeep. Then, when the sun rose and we awoke in the crisp morning desert air, we were so surprised we had just camped at the Fisher Towers trailhead. A nice view to wake up to.

A few of the Fisher Towers. Ancient Art's corkscrew summit on the left and Cottontail Tower on the right.

A few of the Fisher Towers as seen on the hike into Ancient Art. The Kingfisher is on the far left. Ancient Art’s corkscrew summit is to the right of the Kingfisher. Then, comes Echo Tower and Cottontail Tower on the right side of the picture.

We arrived at the trailhead around 10:30pm and coincidentally parked adjacent the bathroom facilities. We hung out for a bit, having a beer, then we crashed in the back of our cars. Mikey and I in the back of Kristine’s subaru with the tailgate open to the cool night air. It was a great night of sleep. It seemed as if it had rained that day as the ground was a bit damp and the last thing we wanted to do was to climb mud towers if they were at all damp from a safety perspective but also from an environmental protection perspective for these towers. We were hoping to wake up to a sunny morning in order to dry things out quickly, but all we woke up to was a cloudy morning and a Moab Septic truck racing up the dirt road to empty the bathroom facilities. A grizzled man with no shoes hopped out of the septic truck as we were making coffee and said “Boys, I’m about to ruin that breakfast.” While disappointing, it was hilarious. We moved across the parking lot and what emanated from the pit below the bathrooms when he opened the lid was the single worst odor I had ever experienced. I think all of the boys agreed. I believe Mikey may have been gagging. I was close. However, the grizzled old septic man didn’t bat an eye and promptly hooked up his hose to the tank and began to pump. We continued to grin and bear the smell until Moab Septic left the premises and we had a newly clean bathroom to take advantage of. Steve went first as other campers were lining up. There is a 60′ tower called Lizard Rock literally a 30 second walk from the parking lot that I had wanted to climb and so Steve, Mikey, and I went over there while Derek went for a hike on the Fishers Tower trail to check out Ancient Art and the other towers. The sun was starting to poke through the clouds and things seemed like they would dry out nicely in a few hours time. I led the route called Entry Fee (5.9-) up the tower to the summit and set up a top rope. The route was a bit run-out and I didn’t see the old bolt protecting the final crux moves, but a #1 camalot in a mud pocket made up for the bolt – sort of :)

Me leading up Lizard Rock. Photo by Steve

Me leading up Lizard Rock. Photo by Steve

Me on top of Lizard Rock

Me on top of Lizard Rock. Photo by Derek

I then lowered down and climbed the old Ed Webster 5.10- route to the left of Entry Fee called Leaping Lizards.

Me on Leaping Lizards. Photo by Derek

Me on Leaping Lizards. Photo by Derek

The boys then took their turns each summitting Lizard Rock. I think the campers at the small Fisher Tower campground enjoyed watching us climb.

Mikey

Mikey

Mikey high on Lizard Rock

Mikey high on Lizard Rock

Ancient Art's 4 summits in the foreground with Cottontail Tower behind. You can see the Corkscrew summit as the far right summit

Ancient Art’s 4 summits in the foreground with Cottontail Tower behind. You can see the Corkscrew summit as the far right summit

Steve on Leaping Lizards

Steve on Leaping Lizards

Steve

Steve

Derek

Derek

Derek on top of Lizard Rock

Derek on top of Lizard Rock

The sun was out in full-force by now and we packed up and went back to the parking lot by 11:30am. Derek had secured a campsite for he and Steve that evening as well. We had a bit of lunch, geared up, and then made the 30 minute hike to the base of Ancient Art along the gorgeous Fisher Tower trail. By now, there were numerous dayhikers and the parking lot was full. However, it still seemed as if we were the only climbers, which was a great thing for climbing Stolen Chimney.

On the way to the base of the route. Castleton Tower and the Rectory can be seen in the distance

On the way to the base of the route. Castleton Tower and the Rectory can be seen in the distance

Ancient Art's corkscrew summit high above

Ancient Art’s corkscrew summit high above

We arrived at the base of the route around 12:30pm and all the soil, rock, everything was completely dried out and there was not another climber in sight! Perfect! We couldn’t believe there was no one else given its a Saturday in last April on a very popular route. We’ll take it! Derek & I roped up together and I took on up the 1st pitch placing a cam along the first 50′ of broken 5.6 rock and came to the first of the two cruxes of the route: a well-protected (bolted) 20′ section of delicate 5.10+ climbing. I led this clean making a few balanced stemming moves and pulled the lip up to the anchors. It was very fun climbing.

Me leading the crux 5.10+ section of the 1st pitch

Me leading the crux 5.10+ section of the 1st pitch. Photo by Derek

And another of me on the 1st pitch with the entire Stolen Chimney route visible above me along with the Corkscrew summit. Photo by Derek

And another of me on the 1st pitch with the entire Stolen Chimney route visible above me along with the Corkscrew summit. Photo by Derek

I then belayed Derek up to me with Mikey right on his heels leading for team Cizik/Santoro. Derek handed me my quickdraws and gear and I went to work on the 5.8 chimney of pitch 2. This was probably my favorite pitch of the route. Really fun climbing and well-protected and its a lengthy pitch at maybe 100′.

Derek climbing the crux 5.10+ section of the 1st pitch

Derek climbing the crux 5.10+ section of the 1st pitch

Me looking down from the pitch 2 chimney on the belay of pitch 1 and Steve way below at the route's base

Me looking down from the pitch 2 chimney on the belay of pitch 1 and Steve way below at the route’s base

Upon reaching the spacious belay ledge at the top of pitch 2, I set up to belay Derek up to me. I could feel the wind a bit hitting the west side of the tower and could hear it whistling. Yep, it would be a blustery summit! Steve led pitch 2 for the Cizik/Santoro team and Steve arrived shortly after Derek.

Steve at the top of the chimney of pitch 2

Steve at the top of the chimney of pitch 2

Pitch 3 is very short maybe 40′, but its indeed airy and had the toughest free climbing move of the route in my opinion between the last bolt and the anchors (5.10+). I led it clean though, which I was happy about. I then belayed Derek up to me on a very airy perch!

Belaying Derek up the 3rd pitch with Steve on the spacious belay ledge below

Belaying Derek up the 3rd pitch with Steve on the spacious belay ledge below

Derek topping out on the 3rd pitch

Derek topping out on the 3rd pitch

Ready for the summit pitch!

Ready for the summit pitch!

With Derek anchored into the bolts, he belayed me across the airy catwalk. The wind was definitely in full effect and so I definitely used my hands and bent down for balance. I then mantled the so-called “diving board” and clipped the 1st bolt. A few fun 5.8 moves and two more bolts and I was at the summit pitch’s anchors. I then climbed a few feet higher and stood on the corkscrew summit. It was amazing and I had never been on such an exposed summit as this.

Me climbing the corkscrew

Me climbing the corkscrew

Me at the summit anchors

Me at the summit anchors

Me standing on the corkscrew summit of Ancient Art!

Me standing on the corkscrew summit of Ancient Art!

Self-portrait of me on the corkscrew summit

Self-portrait of me on the corkscrew summit

Derek then lowered me down and I reversed the diving board and catwalk all the while leaving the quickdraws on the bolts. We then pulled the rope through the draws and summit anchor so Derek could climb through the bolts. It was Derek’s turn.

Derek on the catwalk

Derek on the catwalk

Mantling the diving board

Mantling the diving board

Derek climbing the corkscrew summit tower

Derek climbing the corkscrew summit tower

Derek on top!

Derek on top!

I then lowered Derek down and he reversed the diving board and catwalk and I continued to lower him down all the way to the spacious ledge atop pitch 2 with Mikey and Steve. Steve wanted me to stay atop the 3rd pitch so I could take pics of team Cizik/Santoro. No problem!

Lowering Derek down the 3rd pitch

Lowering Derek down the 3rd pitch

Steve climbing pitch 3

Steve climbing pitch 3

Mikey coming up pitch 3

Mikey coming up pitch 3

I was only anchored into the anchors and completely independent of Steve & Mike’s rope, so I just relaxed and took pics/video.

Steve on the catwalk. He walked this very well

Steve on the catwalk. He walked this line very well

Steve on the diving board

Steve on the diving board

Steve climbing the corkscrew summit

Steve climbing the corkscrew summit

Steve on the corkscrew summit of Ancient Art!

Steve on the corkscrew summit of Ancient Art!

Mikey was up next. He said this final pitch definitely kept him on his toes!

Set to go

Set to go

Mikey mantling the diving board

Mikey mantling the diving board

Mikey

Mikey

Mikey on the corkscrew summit of Ancient Art!

Mikey on the corkscrew summit of Ancient Art!

We then all rappelled back down to Derek at the big spacious ledge atop pitch 2 and set up a full length double rope rappel to the ground. The ropes were just barely long enough and what a fun rappel it was.

Derek rappelling

Derek rappelling

Back down at the base of the route around 4pm, we stowed our gear away and looked up at Ancient Art again in awe. What a spectacular climb. And, to have the route all to ourselves – amazing!

At the base

At the base

We then decided to take an extra 30 minutes and hike further out the trail to see a few more of the towers up close since it was such a nice afternoon.

Cottontail Tower up close from its base

Cottontail Tower up close from its base

The Titan is on the left - the largest of the Fisher Towers

The Titan is on the right – the largest of the Fisher Towers

Looking back at Ancient Art's corkscrew summit

Looking back at Ancient Art’s corkscrew summit

And a final team picture with Ancient Art behind

And a final team picture with Ancient Art behind

Back at the cars around 5:30pm, we all hung out and enjoyed the weather over a beer. Mikey and I headed out in Kristine’s subaru shortly after 6pm to make the trip back to Edwards. Derek & Steve camped another night and toured Arches National Park in the morning. What a fantastic 24 hour trip to the desert to climb this classic route with good buddies.

Steve put together a pretty funny Ancient Art montage here in one of his classic videos. Hope you enjoy:

Cold Climbing in the Monument

Typically, when a decent storm rolls into Colorado bringing snow, one would want to head for the slopes or backcountry for some powder turns. Well, Steve, Mike, and myself decided to head west to get out of the snow and onto some sandstone. It wasn’t looking too promising, but we pulled it off and got on some nice cracks and a tower to boot. However, it was indeed some chilly climbing (temps in high 30s at the warmest part of the day), especially in the shade and when the sun was not out. Our original plan was to head to the Fisher Towers to climb Ancient Art, but it is a teetering tower of mud and would not have been safe after a snowstorm (as it wouldn’t have dried properly) nor would have been good climbing karma to climb this tower so soon after it snowed. The harder sandstone near Grand Junction in Colorado National Monument was safer and in no way did we stand a chance of harming the rock.

Me leading the 1st pitch of Dewar Dihedral (5.10), a new route I had not climbed on the Monolith Spire

Me leading the 1st pitch of Dewar Dihedral (5.10), a new route I had not climbed on the Monolith Spire

Steve on Dewar Didedral

Steve on Dewar Dihedral. This route has a 2nd pitch, but having three of us just didn’t make sense with the hanging belay at the top of the 1st pitch. Next time we’ll do the 2nd pitch

Mikey

Mikey

Steve. For some reason when I led this route it was freezing! It got warmer as the afternoon progressed even though then sun was behind the clouds

Steve. For some reason when I led this route it was freezing! It got warmer as the afternoon progressed even though then sun was behind the clouds

Mike on a close to dark lead of Left Dihedral (5.8+)

Mike on a close to dark lead of Left Dihedral (5.8+)

Instead of driving to some trailhead in the dark and suffering through a cold night in the desert, the young Mike followed Steve and my lead and we all checked into the Comfort Inn in Fruita and had a comfortable night in a warm bed. Steve & Mike had never climbed Independence Monument, the 400′ free-standing tower in Colorado National Monument, via its moderate classic 5.9- route called Otto’s Route. I had climbed it twice, the first time with Jesse Hill and the second time with Kristine, and knew it well. The only issue with Otto’s Route was that the 1st three pitches were on the west side in the shade. It was to be very chilly on the fingers and toes. I was the 3rd wheel along for the ride taking pictures while Steve led pitches 1 and 4 and Mike took pitches 2 and 3. Finally, we got in the sun at the top of pitch 3 and it was a sunny and warmer pitch 4 and summit.

Hiking the 2 miles into Independence Monument

Hiking the 2 miles into Independence Monument

Bighorns enjoying the morning sun

Bighorns enjoying the morning sun

Steve making one of the most awkward moves of the day on the 5.6 pitch 1. The cold really contributed to zero friction between your hands and shoes and the rock, i.e. the cold made 5.6 feel way harder

Steve making one of the most awkward moves of the day on the 5.6 pitch 1. The cold really contributed to zero friction between your hands and shoes and the sandy rock, i.e. the cold made 5.6 feel way harder

Mike leading the 5.8+ off-width pitch 2

Mike leading the 5.8+ off-width pitch 2

Top of pitch 2

Top of pitch 2

Me belaying Mike on lead up the 5.7 pitch 3

Me belaying Mike on lead up the 5.7 pitch 3

Mike belaying Steve up pitch 3

Mike belaying Steve up pitch 3

Me topping out on pitch 3...into the sun, finally!

Me topping out on pitch 3…into the sun, finally!

Steve beginning pitch 4

Steve beginning pitch 4

Steve leading the really fun 5.9- roof move/mantle to the summit

Steve leading the really fun 5.9- roof move (mantle) to the summit

And Mikey is off on pitch 4

And Mikey is off on pitch 4

Steve belaying Mikey up the roof

Steve belaying Mikey up the roof

Its then just a short belay away from the true summit cap. Mikey took this pic of Steve and me way down below

Its then just a short belay away from the true summit cap. Mikey took this pic of Steve and me way down below

Me goofing around on the roof move

Me goofing around on the roof move

Independence Monument summit

Independence Monument summit

Gorgeous Monument Canyon from the summit

Gorgeous Monument Canyon from the summit

A nice hiker took this pic of us from the ground. You can see my red jacket on the summit of Independence Monument

A nice hiker (Toni Leuthold from Winter Park) took this pic of us from the ground. You can see my red jacket on the summit of Independence Monument

Me rapping off the summit. Photo by Toni Leuthold

Me rapping off the summit. Photo by Toni Leuthold

Two double rope rappels and we were down on the ground again around 1:30pm. We started hiking back down Monument Canyon and the high clouds rolled in and blocked the sun yet again. It got pretty chilly. Oh well, at least we had sun for the tower’s final pitch and summit. We wanted to go to the fun 120′ crack route called Wide Load (5.10) that I had climbed before, but a pair of climbers were on it. So, we bouldered around for 30 minutes waiting for them to finish up. Steve set up his phone and speakers to get the Broncos game. Climbing Wide Load seemed tougher than normal because of the cold but all good fun. However, listening to the Broncos game was not fun. Disappointing to say the least.

Mikey leading Wide Load (5.10)

Mikey leading Wide Load (5.10)

Steve at the roof on Wide Load

Steve at the roof on Wide Load

We pulled the rope and then I led Wide Load

We pulled the rope and then I led Wide Load

By 4:30pm, it was just too cold to stay out. Our fingers and toes were numb. We packed up and headed out to the trailhead. All in all, despite a less than favorable forecast, we made the most of our rock climbing weekend and got on some good stuff. I’m looking forward to hopefully another one or two winter trips to the desert.

Bottle Top Tower

Bottle Top Tower is a tower formation in Colorado National Monument with a top that, well, looks like a bottle top. I’ve walked by it half a dozen times climbing at Tiara Rado and have always wanted to climb its fun-looking 5.9+ route on its south side called the Bouncing Betty Route. Its only one pitch, but several hundred feet of fun class 3 to low 5th class scrambling leads up to the saddle between the tower and the mesa.

Late afternoon shade on Bottle Top Tower during the hike out from one of our visits at Tiara Rado

Late afternoon shade on Bottle Top Tower during the hike out from one of our visits at Tiara Rado

The slabs we scrambled up and right to the saddle between the tower and the mesa

The slabs we scrambled up and right to the saddle between the tower and the mesa

My buddy Ryan Marsters was on his week-long desert binge for Thanksgiving week and met me at the Gold Star Canyon trailhead around 9:30am on a Sunday morning to kick off his week. After maybe an hour or so of hiking and fun scrambling up the slabs, we made our way to the saddle and found the interesting crack on the tower’s south face which led to the summit.

Ryan scrambling up a spicy slab

Ryan scrambling up a spicy slab

Ryan doing some stem work

Ryan doing some stem work

Me trying to mimic his maneauvers

Me trying to mimic his maneuvers. Photo by Ryan

The 5.9+ crack to the summit is on the right

The 5.9+ crack to the summit is on the right

The research we had done said it to be a nice “hand crack”. Well, yes, it was a hand crack of sorts for a portion of it, but the description failed to mention a good 15-20′ section of tough, sandy off-width climbing where you really had to jamb your body and bend you leg 90 degrees using your knee on one side and your foot on the other side. There was a hand crack in the back of this off-width, but was way too far back to utilize. I think at one point I used my hips as an actual jamb. This was definitely 5.9+ climbing and being off-width felt harder than that especially since I’m not all that particular good at off-width climbing. Nevertheless, Ryan was patient with me and I pulled the small hand crack roof move at the top of the off-width and got to a decent rest. It was then fairly smooth sailing to the summit anchors (nothing over 5.8). I was glad I led the route clean.

Me starting up the crack

Me starting up the crack. Photo by Ryan

In the off-width portion. Photo by Ryan

In the off-width portion. Photo by Ryan

Me using my hip jamb. Photo by Ryan

Me using my hip jamb. Photo by Ryan

More hip jamming. Photo by Ryan

More hip jamming. Photo by Ryan

Grabbing a cam to put in the roof. Photo by Ryan

Grabbing a cam to put in the roof. Photo by Ryan

Me in the chimney portion near the top of the route. Photo by Ryan

Me in the chimney portion near the top of the route. Photo by Ryan

The two bolted anchors are on a great ledge a few feet below the summit cap. I then belayed Ryan up to me as he cleaned the route. Even though only one 80-90′ pitch of technical climbing, Bottle Top Tower was a great summit and a fun adventure.

Ryan in the chimney almost up to me at the anchors

Ryan in the chimney almost up to me at the anchors

Ryan peering over the summit cap's edge at Grand Junction

Ryan peering over the summit cap’s edge at Grand Junction

Looking east to Liberty Cap Tower in the distance

Looking east to Liberty Cap Tower in the distance

Ryan found a frozen pool of water on the summit

Ryan found a frozen pool of water on the summit

I set up my camera's timer and tried to time me karate chopping the ice ala Karate Kid Part II, but it ended up being too thick and the this was the resulting picture. Looks like I am punching Ryan :)

I set up my camera’s timer and tried to time me karate chopping the ice ala Karate Kid Part II, but it ended up being too thick and the this was the resulting picture. Looks like I am punching Ryan :)

Bottle Top Tower summit (5,755')

Bottle Top Tower summit (5,755′)

A nice view

A nice view

It was about noon and we rappelled the summit pitch after a good 20 minutes up top. We then stowed the rope and scrambled down the slabs back to the trail, which would take us over to Tara Rado for a few pitches of climbing. Ryan had never been to Tiara Rado, so I was excited to show him a few of my favorites.

Ryan rappelling

Ryan rappelling

Me rapping off Bottle Top Tower. Photo by Ryan

Me rapping off Bottle Top Tower. Photo by Ryan

Looking back at the tower's summit pitch

Looking back at the tower’s summit pitch. Photo by Ryan

Ryan on a nice perch on the descent

Ryan on a nice perch on the descent

Ryan heading down a fun chimney

Ryan heading down a fun chimney

Down-scrambling

Down-scrambling. Photo by Ryan

Ole Tiara Rado

Ole Tiara Rado

Ryan leading Short-Cupped Hands (5.9+)

Ryan leading Short-Cupped Hands (5.9+)

Me starting up 100' Hands (5.10b)

Me starting up 100′ Hands (5.10b)

Ryan on 100' Hands

Ryan on 100′ Hands

By 3pm it was getting pretty chilly and uncomfortable in the shade, so we decided to call it a day given we had a 45 minute hike back to the cars. All in all a great day out with Ryan and by 4pm I was heading back home and he was heading west to meet up with friends.

The Davis Face: Carter Classic

The Oelbergers came to town and offered to care for Sawyer for a whole day and even a night so Kristine and I could get away together. This is always so very nice of them and is so much appreciated. We took them up on their offer though we only made it a daytrip. I just think we hated to leave Sawyer and the dogs overnight when we really didn’t have a specific destination that required us to overnight. So, we all had breakfast together, played and fed the dogs, and jetted out of Edwards for Buena Vista around 8:45am this past Saturday morning. We were intent on climbing the awesome 6 pitch moderate traditional rock climb called the Carter Classic on the Davis Face. I climbed this Carter Classic route almost 3 years ago to the day and it was one of my favorite multi-pitch rock climbs I had done. It even has an alpine-like feel to it since its all climbing above 10,000′. And, the views looking west from the face at the snow-covered Sawatch 14ers is just amazing. I just knew I had to go back with Kristine as I thought she would really enjoy it. The crux of the climb is low on the 2nd pitch and involves surmounting a roof and goes at 5.9. The majority of the rest of the pitches are a bit easier than 5.9 ranging from 5.6-5.8+ with an exposed no-pro friction traverse rated at 5.4 on pitch 5.

The Carter Classic route up the Davis Face. What a wonderful multi-pitch trad route in a spectacular setting

The Carter Classic route up the Davis Face. What a wonderful multi-pitch trad route in a spectacular setting

We parked and made the 30 minute steep uphill hike to the base of the Davis Face and got on the rock before noon. It was such a beautiful day and the rock heated up quite nice throughout the day because of the southwesterly sun even though the air temperature never got above 55 degrees.

Kristine following up the long 120' pitch 1 rated at 5.6

Kristine following up the long 120′ pitch 1 rated at 5.6

Pitch 1 belay

Pitch 1 belay

I have to admit though that the 5.9 crux “roof” move on pitch 2 is tough (for 5.9). Especially leading it with a backpack on with our tagline and jackets and water in it and my heavy camera binered to my harness. However, it was a good challenge and I led it clean and belayed Kristine from the awkward pitch 2 belay. Kristine climbed this pitch so smoothly that I think she surprised herself. She did so very well and was up to me at the belay in no time.

Kristine through the crux 5.9 "roof" on pitch 2

Kristine through the crux 5.9 “roof” on pitch 2

Kristine switching cracks and having a great time on pitch 2

Kristine switching cracks and having a great time on pitch 2

Pitch 3 is a short but nice 5.8 chimney and allows for some action shots of the follower:

Kristine climbing the 5.8 pitch 3

Kristine climbing the 5.8 pitch 3

All smiles

All smiles

Climbers on the 5.10a sport route called D4 to the south of the Carter Classic

Climbers on the 5.10a sport route called D4 to the south of the Carter Classic

Kristine almost to the pitch 3 belay

Kristine almost to the pitch 3 belay

Pitch 3 belay

Pitch 3 belay

Climbers have dubbed the short 5.8+ pitch 4 as the “mental” crux of the route. I guess because you are high off the deck and its a bit runout (like 8-10′ between placements) when leading the pitch. However, I was able to lead the pitch clean and then Kristine followed with no issues at all. The pitch 4 belay is a decent little ledge, but is fairly airy.

Kristine finishing up the 5.8+ pitch 4

Kristine finishing up the 5.8+ pitch 4

Pitch 4 belay

Pitch 4 belay

Pitch 5 has a 5.4 no-pro “friction” traverse to begin, which leads over to a fun 5.7 dihedral. The traverse is a bit “airy” and I seemed to not find any good crimper holds for my fingers to get to the ledge. I just sort of went for it and fortunately didn’t blow the small leap move. Kristine did this much better than I and just seemed to cruise it with no hesitation.

Kristine getting into the 5.7 dihedral of pitch 5

Kristine getting into the 5.7 dihedral of pitch 5

Fun climbing

Fun climbing

Stemming

Stemming…

...and sticking!

…and sticking!

Pitch 5 belay

Pitch 5 belay

Pitch 6 is long but really no move over 5.8 and I belayed Kristine up from the nice two bolt anchor at the top of the face. I believe we topped out around 3:30pm or so and it was still fairly sunny though a bit breezy.

Looking down at Kristine at the Pitch 5 belay from near the top of Pitch 6

Looking down at Kristine at the Pitch 5 belay from near the top of Pitch 6

Kristine at the top of the Carter Classic route on the Davis Face

Kristine at the top of the Carter Classic route on the Davis Face

Great to be out together

Great to be out together

We busted out my new 7mm/60m tagline we had been carrying up in the backpack the entire route and I was curious to test this guy out. Its a much lighter option than bringing an a second full-diameter rope, but we weren’t overly impressed with it. With the tagline rope method, you rappel off your single full-diameter climbing rope as opposed to both full-diameter climbing ropes. I think I just don’t like the fact of the possibility of the knot pulling through the rappel bolts (though very unlikely) and then there is no way to pull the knot back through to get the ropes down. I think keeping a tagline on alpine routes that could potentially require a double rope rappel in case of retreat is a good idea, but for more multi-pitch routes that require multiple double rope rappels, I think we’ll stick with two full-diameter ropes. Enough about rappel methods. Everything went smoothly and in three double rope rappels we were back on the ground at the base of the route.

Looking south along the face

Looking south along the face

Me almost to the ground on the last double rope rap

Me almost to the ground on the last double rope rap

We were back in Buena Vista having dinner at one of our favorite little Mexican restaurants, Casa del Sol, by 6pm and then back home by 8:45pm. What a great time out together doing what initially brought us together in a gorgeous setting. An enormous thanks to Ken & Dianne for shouldering our responsibilities for a day so we could get out together – just us.

Until next time, Davis Face

Until next time, Davis Face

Crack Cragging in the High Desert

I always enjoy driving a few hours west of the Vail Valley to the high desert to crack climb. Its one of my favorite trips to do. No need to drive to Moab or Indian Creek or even into Utah for that matter. 2 hours and you can be in Colorado National Monument and then just shy of 3 hours you can be in Escalante Canyon. Mikey, J, and I did a daytrip to Colorado National Monument, specifically Tiara Rado, to hone our crack climbing skills in preparation for a few days in Indian Creek, Utah the following weekend. This was my 4th time at Tiara Rado, and while I wouldn’t recommend it for beginners (its easiest route is a tough 70′ cupped hands crack that goes at 5.9+), it is a great place in a nice setting and even gives you a 45 minute hike each way to/from the car.

Mikey leading Short Cupped Hands (5.9+)

Mikey leading Short Cupped Hands (5.9+)

Mikey placing gear

Mikey placing gear

Short Cupped Hands is a short route but full of excitement

Short Cupped Hands is a short route but full of excitement

Me leading 100' Hands (5.10b) on a gorgeous sunny day

Me leading 100′ Hands (5.10b) on a gorgeous sunny day

100' Hands

100′ Hands

Me getting higher. This is a sustained 100' 5.10 crack

Me getting higher. This is a sustained 100′ 5.10 crack

Me nearing the anchors - thank goodness!

Me nearing the anchors – thank goodness!

J then top-roped 100' Hands to get the feel for it

J then top-roped 100′ Hands to get the feel for it

Mikey on lead on 100' Hands

Mikey on lead on 100′ Hands

Mikey

Mikey

Looking up

Looking up

Mikey spotted this Rocky Mountain Bighorn from halfway up 100' Hands

Mikey spotted this Rocky Mountain Bighorn from halfway up 100′ Hands

Mikey's strength left him about halfway up 100' Hands and so J finished it off

Mikey’s strength left him about halfway up 100′ Hands and so J finished it off

J nearing the anchors on the wider section. What a great route

J nearing the anchors on the wider section. What a great route

Rainier, Kona, J, & myself were planning to head down to Indian Creek the next weekend since Sawyer & Kristine were heading to Dune Acres, Indiana on Lake Michigan for a girl’s weekend with all the Bates gals and their baby gals. However, the forecast was for a wet and dreary weekend in Utah, so that plan was called off. Fortunately, the Chalk ladies had wonderfully sunny weather on the shores of Lake Michigan. Sawyer just loved playing in the sand.

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I kept checking the weather forecast for another of my favorite spots which was about half the driving distance as Indian Creek from Edwards. The weather forecast for Escalante Canyon, CO looked favorable with possible rain starting Saturday evening. Good enough! The dogs, J, Tamra, Trevor, & Chelsey all packed up and headed west in my car and Tamra’s car for some car camping and cragging. While its fun to try and climb multi-pitch routes, its much more important to me these days to spend as much time as possible with Rainier and have her with me at all times since she is getting up there in age at almost 13 years old. She gave us a scare last week with a mass on her spleen, but fortunately the tests confirmed it being non-cancerous. We have to figure out now if its worth removing or if she can live with it as long as it doesn’t get any larger. Doing single pitch routes at crags is a lot of fun and means I can have the dogs with me as well. I believe you actually get more climbing in doing single pitch cragging than multi-pitch climbs, though it sure is fun topping out on a tower after a few pitches of climbing. My friend Natalie Moran also joined us that morning as she is living close by in Delta going to massage therapy school. She had no idea Escalante was in her backyard and I think was pleasantly surprised. Anyway, we got to the canyon just in time for me to take J over to one of my most favorite crack climbs called Willy’s Hand Jive just before dark. I led it and then we both climbed it twice. He loved it. The next morning Natalie met us about 8am at camp and we all went out and had a great day of climbing. I know there are a lot of climbing photos below, but you should have seen how many I actually took :)

Hiking up to Willy's Hand Jive. Photo by Natalie

Hiking up to Willy’s Hand Jive. Photo by Natalie

J on the classic splitter of Willy's (5.10+)

J leading Willy’s Hand Jive (5.10+). Photo by Natalie

I like this one of J leading Willy's

I like this one of J leading Willy’s

Natalie jamming on Willy's

Natalie jamming on Willy’s

Natalie at the pod crux near the top

Natalie at the pod crux near the top

Tamra's first go at a proper crack!

Tamra’s first go at a proper crack!

Tamra

Tamra

J again doing a lap

J again doing a lap

Me leading this 5.9+ route called Rusty's Cave. I'm actually in the cave near the top of the route

Me leading this 5.9+ route called Rusty’s Cave. I’m actually in the cave near the top of the route

Me making the crux off-width move to the anchors on Rusty's Cave

Me making the crux off-width move to the anchors on Rusty’s Cave

Tamra climbing Rusty's Cave

Tamra climbing Rusty’s Cave

Gus & Rainier

Gus & Rainier

Rainier enjoying the desert cloud cover

Rainier enjoying the desert cloud cover

Looking over at Natalie climbing Rusty's Cave from the base of Willy's

Looking over at Natalie climbing Rusty’s Cave from the base of Willy’s

Natalie

Natalie

Desert dogs

Desert dogs

I then led Willy’s Hand Jive clean this time with no rests and set up to take photos of the crew from above. I pulled the rope up to me while J took the other rope and led the route as well.

After a few times in which I've always had to rest on the rope at the crux pod orjust above not able to make the final move, I finally redpointed (no rests) this route and it felt good :)

After a few times in which I’ve always had to rest on the rope at the crux pod when leading Willy’s, I finally redpointed (no rests) this route and it felt good :)

J leading Willy's

J leading Willy’s

J jamming with Natalie belaying below

J jamming with Natalie belaying below

J negotiating the crux pod near the top

J negotiating the crux pod near the top. I’d rate the crux pod climbing as 5.0+ or likely 5.11- moves. Its tricky and the slightly overhanging nature adds to the spice

J reaching for the crucial face hold to the pod's left

J reaching for the crucial face hold to the pod’s left

J reaching for the ledge

J reaching for the ledge

Natalie starting up Willy's

Natalie starting up Willy’s

Natalie cleaning the route

Natalie cleaning the route

I like this one. Shows the intensity

I like this one. Shows the intensity

One last lap on Willy's for me

One last lap on Willy’s for me

Then, for the last 2 hours of our afternoon before we headed home, we hiked up to the Interiors Wall and climbed two fairly short routes we knew well.

Hiking to the Interiors Wall. Photo by Natalie

Hiking to the Interiors Wall. Photo by Natalie

Escalante Canyon. Photo by Natalie

Escalante Canyon. Photo by Natalie

Me leading Right of Lieback (5.10a). Photo by Natalie

Me leading Right of Lieback (5.10a). Photo by Natalie

Higher up on Right of Lieback

Higher up on Right of Lieback

Making the mantle to the anchors on Right of Lieback. Photo by Natalie

Making the mantle to the anchors on Right of Lieback. Photo by Natalie

J leading Lieback (5.9). Photo by Natalie

J leading Lieback (5.9). Photo by Natalie

A great 24 hours in Escalante Canyon with a great crew. Hopefully, we can get to Indian Creek later this year for some more crack climbing fun.